IN SANTA CROCE WITH NO BAEDEKER : A WINTER BREAK IN FLORENCE

IN SANTA CROCE WITH NO BAEDEKER: A WINTER BREAK IN FLORENCE

The picture that E.M.Forster paints of 19th-century Florence is irresistibly alluring and slightly repellant at the same time. His characters fall head-over-heels under its thrall, find romance and adventure and yet are only too conscious of its danger and its potential for perdition. Florence is Paradise and Inferno; it is after all the city of Dante.

Forster in ‘A Room with a View’ encapsulates this contradiction in the scene where his heroine audaciously takes to the streets unaccompanied and gets embroiled in a terrifying scene culminating in the horrid and violent death of a beautiful young man. Some of the most glorious achievements of Western Culture are to be seen in Florence. Yet it is the city where Savaranola was burnt at the stake for preaching austerity, where the Medici disembowelled their enemies before hanging them from the windows of the Palazzo Vecchio and where the Black Death stalked the streets for the best part of three hundred years. Orson Welles’s ‘cuckoo-clock’ diatribe also comes to mind.

After nightfall on a January evening, you might well find yourself completely alone in the narrow streets around the Ponte Vecchio. Alone, that is, except for the company of the shades of Florence past, including Lucy from ‘Room with a View’. It is a wonderful time to be in the city. You might even fool yourself that you are not in the most tourist-oriented city in Europe. The museums are empty; even the legendary queues outside the Uffizi are conspicuous by their absence.

We stayed in a perfect hotel: the Torre Guelfa, located 100 yards from the Ponte Vecchio, 200 from the Uffizi and housed in a 13th-century stately mansión complete with its eponymous Medieval Tower. In five days we did all but one of the ’15 things you must do in Florence’: we never did get up to the Church of San Miniato and its spectacular view of the city. No excuse. It’s a bit of a schlepp, especially in the Winter.

But we did walk through the Vasarian Corridor which joins the Palazzo Vecchio and the Uffizi to the Palazzo Pitti and is an Art Gallery in its own right. We admired the frescoes in San Marco and the sculptures in the Museo Bargello; we spent an hour fixed on the remarkable cupola in the Baptistery and several hours transported by the beauty of the newly restored Cathedral Museum. And, we walked. Up to the Accademia; over the River; up to Santa Maria Novella. We took tea in the Caffé Paszkowski and ice-cream in Carraia. And, of course, we went to

Santa Croce with no Baedeker.

Previous Post
IN SEARCH OF LORCA
Next Post
TRIP TO TERUEL FEATURE. THE TELEGRAPH

Related Posts

No results found

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fill out this field
Fill out this field
Please enter a valid email address.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Menu